CN: Family Planning Posters: 60’s

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1960s: Practicing birth control is beneficial for the protection of the health of mother and child

Various types of campaigns to manage the size of the population started as early as the mid-1950s. Generally speaking, they were targeted at women. The early campaigns concentrated on family planning rather than on population reduction, but it was obvious that all aspects of birth control were considered to be a female responsibility. This impression was strengthened further by the fact that the person in charge of the implementation of the policy was the (local) representative of the Women’s Federation – usually a woman. In the period of mass upheaval that marked the Great Leap Forward, there was no time and no political inclination to address population issues.

Designer unknown (佚名)
early 1960s?
Practicing birth control is beneficial for the protection of the health of mother and child
Shixing jihua shengyu youli yu baohu muqin he ertongde jiankang (实行计划生育有利于保护母亲和儿童的健康)
Publisher unknown
Size: 77×53 cm.
Call number: BG E15/717 (Landsberger collection)
– Chinese Posters: Population Policy:  Family Planning Health.

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1960s: Marrying late has many advantages

As early as 1956, the term “planned childbirth” (jihua shengyu 计划生育) began to buzz around the various departments that were caught up in the planning campaign resulting from the relative successes of the First Five Year Plan. While most leaders continued to advocate birth control rather than birth planning, the latter increasingly became the guiding doctrine. Even Mao supported this development, endorsing the need for birth planning in public at various occasions in 1956-1957.

Designer unknown (佚名)
early 1960s?
Marrying late has many advantages
Wanhun haochu duo (晚婚好处多)
Publisher unknown
Size: 77×53 cm.
Call number: BG E15/716 (Landsberger collection)
– Chinese Posters: Population Policy: Marrying Late.

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Marry Late for the Revolution

To bring this about, a new model of family size was propagated, accompanied by such slogans as “later, spaced and few”, and “one’s not too few, two will do, and three are too many for you”, limiting each couple to two children. Zhou Enlai was the proponent behind this plan, which was unevenly enforced.

Designer unknown (佚名)
Date unknown
Marry late for the revolution
Wei geming shixing wanhun (为革命实行晚婚)
Publisher: Shanxisheng geming weiyuanhui jihua shengyu lingdaozu bangongshi (山西省革命委员会计划生育领导组办公室)
Size: 77×53 cm.
Call number: BG E15/563 (Landsberger collection)
– Chinese Posters: Population Policy: Marry late for Revolution.

Sources:

Elisabeth Croll, Delia Davin, Penny Kane (eds), China’s One-Child Policy (London, etc.: MacMillan, 1985)

Vanessa L. Fong, Only Hope – Coming of Age under China’s One-Child Policy (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2004)

Tyrene White, China’s Longest Campaign – Birth Planning in the People’s Republic, 1949-2005 (Ithaca, etc.: Cornell University Press, 2006)

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